Meeting Your Cat’s Needs Can Reduce Destructive Feline Behaviors

Some cat owners hit the lottery with their cats. They are peaceful, loving, and agreeable when it comes to demanding the perfect balance of food and attention. Other cat owners wonder what they’re doing wrong when they see messes outside the litter box, shredded toilet paper, and couch cushions with claw marks all over them. The differences between certain feline behaviors can hinge on ensuring that all of their environmental needs are met.

Expressing Themselves

Contrary to popular belief, cats are incredibly social animals. Although they may prefer living with littermates, most cats are capable of coexisting with other pets and enjoy the company of their human family members.

Cats are also quite territorial, which can cause problems in some homes. With their highly developed senses of hearing and smell, cats can anticipate threats, and will fight tooth and claw to defend their territories. While it can sometimes be difficult to determine signs of stress or pain in cats, they do employ obvious responses to territorial threats, like hissing, yowling, puffing up, and tail thrashing.

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Winter Pet Safety Hazards: Keeping Your Pet Safe

Winter pet safety is important for cat health and dog health

Even the most conscientious pet owners sometimes make mistakes or overlook situations that might pose a risk to their pet’s safety. In the wintertime, these are mostly outdoor hazards which require awareness, preparation, and knowledge.

As the winter winds and snows comes whistling down, Androscoggin Animal Hospital provides you the resources you need for winter pet safety. If you have any concerns or questions about these tips, please don’t hesitate to contact us. Your pet’s health and safety is our number one priority!

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Why Preventive Care for Cats is Important

Preventive care for cats promotes cat health and a happy catWe love the fun, unique personalities of cats. But behind their mysterious behaviors lies a very important secret: it can sometimes be hard to tell whether your cat is well or not.

We’ve all heard the adage “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure,” and this is never more true than with the health of our pets. Cats need preventive care, and avoiding illness is always easier on you and your beloved feline (not to mention your wallet). So, let’s take a look at why preventive care for cats is so important!

Survival Strategy

The reason it can be difficult to tell when your cat is sick has to do with their survival strategy. In the wild, cats who are perceived as weak can become a target for predators. In order to survive, they’ve developed a deep natural instinct to hide signs of pain or discomfort.

This, of course, means you may not know your cat is sick until an illness has become advanced. This leads us to the importance of preventive care for cats. Continue…

Fork in the Road: How Is a Cat Friendly Veterinarian Better than the Rest?

cat friendly veterinarianA great deal goes into choosing the right veterinarian for your pet. Sometimes, close proximity plays a part in the decision. Other times, the recommendation of a close friend or colleague informs the best possible choice.

Because we understand and value this important decision, Androscoggin Animal Hospital went through the training, education, and evaluation necessary to earn the title of Fear Free Certified Professional. We maintain the distinction of a Cat Friendly Practice, and we’re thrilled we can pass the best possible care onto your cat. So, what are the benefits of having a cat friendly veterinarian?

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Using String, Ribbon, and Tinsel? Not for Holiday Cat Safety!

Cats can be pretty awesome during the holidays. Sure, they probably won’t wear the matching ugly Christmas sweater you knitted for them, but they might allow you to wrap presents while napping on top of the festive paper or attacking your scissors – if you’re lucky. Indeed, many cats like the lights, sparkles, and revelry as much as we do, but that doesn’t mean holiday cat safety can be set aside due to joyful pouncing.

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Letting the Cat Out of the Bag: Why Holiday Pet Safety is a Big Deal

time to playRemember when we were blogging about parasite prevention last spring? It’s hard to believe we’re already rounding the corner toward winter and the holidays, but here we are!

When you think about this time of year, perhaps only the good things come to mind. While scrumptious food, piles of presents, and beautiful decor certainly contribute to the general splendor, they also provide dangerous opportunities for your pet. That’s why we’ve got holiday pet safety on our minds – and we hope you do, too!

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Indoor Cat Activities to Keep Your Kitty Healthy and Active

time to playAlthough there is a lot of focus on dog exercise and playtime, the truth is that our cats need exercise, too. This is particularly the case for indoor kitties whose exercise needs are too often neglected or limited by fewer opportunities for play.

Considering that an estimated 60% of household cats are obese or overweight, there is a strong need for indoor cat activities that help beat boredom and work off calories. Continue…

Calming Your Pet’s Fear of the Vet: Crate Training Cats

Frightened white cat in a cage at vet's office.Taking your cat to the vet’s office may be low on your list of enjoyable activities. First there is the struggle to get kitty into his or her carrier, and then the car ride to the vet with a yowling cat, followed by the ordeal of the actual office visit. It’s no wonder that, although cats are the most popular pet in the U.S., they are more likely to miss out on regular wellness exams than dogs.

Besides choosing a top-notch veterinary practice (ahem), one of the biggest factors is helping your cat overcome his or her fear of the vet is crate training. By crate training your cat ahead of time, you can greatly reduce the level of anxiety that is normally associated with a trip to the vet. Continue…

Diabetes Mellitus in Dogs and Cats Part II: Treatment

What is Diabetes Mellitus?

AAH-9856Once your Dog or Cat has been diagnosed with Diabetes Mellitus (Discussed further in Part I of our Diabetes Mellitus Blog), how is it treated? The short answer is with injections of insulin and with diet. Diabetes Mellitus is a generally treatable condition caused by an insulin deficiency.  Continue…